Virus Outbreak Fake Vaccine Cards

This undated image provided by the United States District Court for the Northern District of California shows two fake CDC COVID-19 Vaccination Record Cards that are part of a criminal complaint. With more than 600 colleges and universities now requiring proof of COVID-19 inoculations, an online industry has sprung up offering fake vaccine cards. Dozens of students interviewed by the Associated Press said they were aware of fake covid-19 vaccination cards, though none admitted to actually using one.

More and more places are requiring proof that you’ve had a COVID-19 vaccine or have recently tested negative before giving you access. Scammers see this as an opportunity to profit by selling fake verification tools or products, like fake vaccination cards, certificates, and test results.

Our advice:

  • Know that buying fake vaccine cards, making your own, or filling in blank cards with false information is illegal and could get you fined, or even land you in jail.
  • Don’t share personal information with people you don’t know. Scammers will turn the tables and sell your data or use it to commit identity theft.
  • The only legitimate way to get proof that you’re vaccinated — or that you test negative — is to GET vaccinated or to TEST negative. If you lose that proof, check with your state health department or the place you got vaccinated to find out how you might be able to get a replacement.

If you spot a fake vaccine card, report it to the Office of the Inspector General of the Department of Health and Human Services at 1-800-HHS-TIPS or oig.hhs.gov, or file a complaint with the FBI’s Internet Crime Complaint Center.

You can also file a report with the FTC at ReportFraud.ftc.gov. Your report can make a difference. We use reports like yours to investigate, bring law enforcement cases, and alert people about what frauds to be on the lookout for so they can protect themselves, their friends, and family.

To learn more about COVID-related scams, visit ftc.gov.coronavirus/scams and subscribe to consumer alerts from the FTC to get updates delivered right to your email inbox.